Jeff Lipschultz’s Blog

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Counter-Offers Can Be Counterproductive

Once in a while, when a job seeker submits their resignation and offers a two-week’s notice, they get a surprise in return: a counter-offer. Quite frequently this includes a match on salary with the new company and sometimes an increase in responsibility. In this situation, many things can go wrong for all involved.

The Candidate Perspective

I once had a friend go through this experience and he was perplexed as to which path to take. He was the one to instigate a job search process, so I was a little surprised there was even a decision to be made. After all, once you start a job search, it’s likely you have already decided, for whatever reason, that it is time to go. The counter-offer covered both money and responsibility. Even long-term growth potential. My friend had a long list of concerns, but in the end, I asked a simple question: “When you drive to work each day, what is it you want to do when you get there?”

In other words, no two jobs or companies are exactly the same. When the current company offers you reasons to stay, you need to remind yourself why you wanted to leave. Will those issues be addressed? Even if there are promises to address them, will they be able to live up to their intentions? Does past performance indicate they are true to their word? Without an employment contract, their word is all you have.

Just remember, money and title are nice. But 40-70+ hours of work per week is a long time to spend doing something (or being somewhere) you don’t enjoy. Most people want to accomplish something professionally. Be sure to consider which opportunity truly offers this chance?

The Current Employer Perspective

No one likes to lose good employees. Especially if we have groomed them, trained them, and depended on them for a long time. However, when an employee makes the hard decision to leave, you must accept you missed the boat somewhere and didn’t address the issues along the way. Trying to band-aid the situation by keeping them on board will likely prove to be temporary. The joy of a raise and new title is short-lived in the working world. Six months later, they will realize they still want to move on.

Sometimes the boss offers a counter just to protect their own reputation. Are you the first to leave the group in a while, or part of a series of folks leaving? Is the timing really bad for the company? You need to assess why the offer is being presented. Is it simply because you are too good to lose? And if so, why did it take a resignation to prompt this kind of action?

If you accept the counter, you should realize that some companies will start a search for a replacement anticipating your future departure. This is a disastrous situation as you may be potentially fired (or overlooked for future promotions). Instead of people moving on and new people moving in allowing for growth for all involved, the situation turns stagnant, and sometimes unfriendly.

The New Employer Perspective

No company has time to waste in a job search. They do not like interviewing candidates who turn out to be just “kicking the tires” and “seeing what’s out there.” They want to meet candidates who are ready to join their team, not consider it.

When a candidate rejects an offer to stay where they are, the relationship between the two is strained or severed. In essence, the company feels the candidate was not honest during the process.This impression is all they remember (and likely marked in their records/database).

If you are only curious about opportunities at a company, take one of their current (or past) employees out to lunch so you can get a true perspective of what it’s like to work there.

Bottom Line

When considering whether you want to leave, make a sound decision. Ask yourself right at the start, “If my company countered an equal offer, would I consider it? And why?” You may just need to have a heart-to-heart with your boss and ask how you can improve your current situation through increased responsibility or redirection of your role. If you do decide to leave, don’t look back unless you’re absolutely certain your old job will become better than the new job.

January 14, 2014 Posted by | Careers, General Musings, Working with Recruiters | Leave a comment

Are You a Scary Candidate?

When conducting a job search, your #1 Goal is to present yourself as an ideal candidate for as many job openings as possible.  You always should present yourself in a positive way.  Common sense, I know.  So it is a bit shocking at times to see how many job seekers can do the opposite.  Often they are not even aware it is happening and they may never find out.  In my latest article for Job-Hunt.org (who just revamped their Web site by the way), I discuss several ways you can unintentionally scare off recruiters (and hiring managers/HR personnel) including:

  • A Horrible Resume
  • Job Hopping
  • Ambivalence
  • Bad Social Media Image
  • Lack of Professionalism
  • Personal Agendas
  • Ignoring Advice or Not Following Directions
  • Dishonesty

Article:  How to Scare Recruiters Away

June 24, 2013 Posted by | General Musings, Interviewing 101, Job Search, Job-Hunt.org article, Personal Branding, Resume Writing, Social Media, Working with Recruiters | Leave a comment

Networking Starts in Grade School

Every smart job seeker knows the value of networking to help the process along.  Not every job seeker realizes their network has a life of its own.  It can be what cinches the deal or sends you packing, too.  My latest article for job-hunt.org has a story to illustrate this, and also pointers on “cleansing your network reputation.”  As always, if you have thoughts on the subject, share them within this post.

Article:  Networking Since Grade School? Yes!

August 15, 2012 Posted by | General Musings, Job Search, Job-Hunt.org article, Personal Branding, Social Media | Leave a comment

Tweet Your Way to a Sweet Job

Self Magazine interviewed me a little while ago for thoughts on Twitter and the Job Search.  They picked the most salient point of our discussion and included it in the August 2012 article.  My quote:

Keep your Tweets 80 percent positive, suggests Jeff Lipschultz, cofounder of recruiting firm A-List Solutions in Southlake, Texas. “You’re allowed to complain about a bad restaurant experience or the terrible weather every once in a while, but hiring managers want someone who will enhance a company’s culture,” Lipschultz says. “Complainers don’t.”

For the online version of this article, click this link.

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August 3, 2012 Posted by | General Musings, Job Search, Social Media | Leave a comment

Don’t Tweet Your Way Out of a Job

twitter picRecently, I was interviewed by SELF magazine regarding job seekers losing credibility through their behaviors on Social Media, namely  Twitter.  Although it’s been discussed by many, including me, it seems there’s still a need to counsel people on how to maintain a professional image within the Social Media world.  With this in mind, I wrote a short article on the subject for my friends at Job-Hunt.  See if you agree with my thoughts.  Either way, feel free to leave comments on this blog.

And the SELF article should be in the August publication (on the shelves and online in mid-July)–we’ll see how much of my interview makes it into the article.

Article:  The Impact of Social Media on Recruiters and Your Next Employer

June 20, 2012 Posted by | General Musings, Job-Hunt.org article, Social Media | Leave a comment

Looking at a Resume through Recruiter’s Eyes

Clearly, there is no end to amount of advice offered on resume writing.  However, every day I read resumes that have glaring mistakes.  Not simply grammar or spelling.  There are resume pitfalls that can cause doubt to arise about you.  It may seem unfair.  At the same time, can you really expect a perfect stranger to know how well you fit the job if you’re conveying a different message?

Although there are many who can provide advice on resumes, including professional resume writers, I thought it would be helpful to share a few of the common errors I see.  Check out my latest article at Job-hunt.org to learn more.  Feel free to add your own advice by commenting on this article within my blog.

Article:  What Recruiters Want to Find on Your Resume

May 7, 2012 Posted by | General Musings, Job Search, Job-Hunt.org article, Resume Writing, Working with Recruiters | Leave a comment

Common Misconceptions about Working with Agency Recruiters

In this article written for Job-Hunt.org, I cover five popular misconceptions about working with agency recruiters.  The article also references several links that may be helpful in understanding how this process works and what to expect.  These misconceptions include:

  • Recruiters will find me a job.
  • All recruiters are the same.
  • Recruiters are career counselors.
  • Apply for all the jobs the recruiter has listed.
  • All I need is a simple LinkedIn profile and the recruiters will be banging on my door.

If you’ve never worked with a recruiter before, this article is a “must read.”

Article: Working with Agency Recruiters

January 17, 2012 Posted by | General Musings, Job-Hunt.org article, Personal Branding, Recruiting Industry, Working with Recruiters | 2 Comments

Compassionate HR podcast with Margo Rose

MargoToday I had the opportunity to be a part of Margo Rose’s Compassionate HR program.  She has periodic podcasts focused on helping job seekers, business owners, and recruiters.  The recorded episode is available on her BlogTalkRadio channel–click this link and scroll to the 12/8/2011 timeframe in the index to find my podcast.

We covered topics such as:

  • How I got into recruiting.
  • How the economy has effected the industry.
  • What job seekers can learn from recruiters.
  • What is the most appropriate way for job seekers to market themselves to recruiters in their industry.
  • Anticipated accomplishments in 2012, both professionally and personally (Margo is a cyclist and couldn’t help asking me about my cycling goals)

If you have a question stemming from the podcast, leave a comment on this blog, and I’ll do my best to answer it.

December 8, 2011 Posted by | Audio, Careers, General Musings, Interview with Jeff, Job Search, Personal Branding, Recruiting Industry, Social Media, Working with Recruiters | 2 Comments

Communication is a Key When Working with Recruiters

I have stated many times that external recruiters can be helpful to you even though you do not pay them. I know this may seem counterintuitive, but the reality is, they cannot do their job without you. Even so, many job seekers keep them in the dark about their job situation or requirements.  It is important to realize, it is hard for a recruiter to do their job well (on your behalf) when they are unsure of your specifics.  Take a look at my latest article for job-hunt.org for more details on this tedious balancing act.

Article:  Keeping the External Recruiter Informed

October 30, 2011 Posted by | General Musings, Job-Hunt.org article, Working with Recruiters | 1 Comment

Are You Positive You Want This Job?

Have you noticed I’m on a little bit of a rant lately with my posts about job seekers.  I absolutely hate to pick on them as their job is so difficult and I don’t expect them to be experts.  After all, if they were experts at job searching and interviewing, that would imply they do it often (not a good indicator of a loyal employee).

But, some recent events have prompted me to identify more pitfalls job seekers fall into.  Practically on a daily basis from my perspective.  If you are applying for jobs, talking with recruiters, or interviewing, please read my latest article for AOL.

Article:  Are You Sure You Want This Job?

March 2, 2011 Posted by | AOL article, General Musings, Interviewing 101, Job Search, Working with Recruiters | Leave a comment

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