Jeff Lipschultz’s Blog

I Think, Therefore I Blog

Managing Career Change

The majority of the working population alter their career path at least once in their professional life.  It could be minor and within their own employer’s walls.  Or, it could be a life-changing event, like leaving consulting to become a high school literature teacher.  Typically, it’s a little tougher to get buy-in from potential employers that you can adequately handle a new role utilizing new skills (as compared to the competition who may have had that role before).  My latest article for job-hunt.org discusses many aspects of managing this leap.

Article:  How to Transition to a New Career

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September 19, 2017 Posted by | Careers, Job Search, Job-Hunt.org article, Resume Writing, Working with Recruiters | Leave a comment

The "Pre-Interview": Informational Interviews

Most know the value of professional networking.  Whether you need a new job now or later, continually building your network with decision-makers and leaders can only help your career in the long run.  I’ve talked with countless colleagues, friends, and job seekers who have told me stories about finding a job (or a job finding them) through a contact they connected with months to years ago.

One of the key ways to establish a strong network and learn about career opportunities (present and future) is to have face-to-face meetings with hiring managers, company owners, or well-connected professionals.  There is a bit of etiquette and approach to doing this.  My latest article for Job-Hunt.org walks you through the process.

Article:  The Hidden Value of Informational Interviews

February 27, 2017 Posted by | Careers, Job Search, Job-Hunt.org article, Personal Branding | Leave a comment

Career Planning & Adult Development Journal

The latest edition of this journal was guest edited by the Editor of job-hunt.org, Susan Joyce.  So naturally, she asked me to be a contributor, along with a large slate of experts in job search.  Access to the Journal is free to you below.  Enjoy.

Journal:  Volume 32, Number 2 Social Recruiting, Personal SEO, and Personal Online Reputation Management

September 29, 2016 Posted by | Careers, Job Search, Job-Hunt.org article, Personal Branding, Recruiting Industry, Social Media, Working with Recruiters | Leave a comment

The Graceful Exit

It’s easy to get excited about starting a new job. It is also common to be anxious to leave your current one to get started as soon as possible.  But we all know the expression about never burning down bridges.  Your reputation in the working world, or even your specific industry, can hinge on this old adage.  I cover the specifics on how to ensure you leave your current job in a professional fashion in my latest article for job-hunt.

Article:  How to Gracefully Leave Your Old Job

November 10, 2014 Posted by | Careers, General Musings, Job-Hunt.org article, References | Leave a comment

Finding a New Job While You Still Have One

We all know there is a balancing act you must perform when searching for a new position while you have a full-time job.  In many cases, it does not reflect well if your boss finds out.  Although, I’ve always contended that there is nothing wrong with doing some “comparison shopping.”  Just like when thinking about buying a new house or car, you first compare what’s out there with what you’ve got.  Perhaps you should be happy with the status quo because it really is better than alternatives available to you.  But how would you know if you didn’t do the research?

The problem is that although the research might be just a cursory look, management may not see it that way.  Best not to “advertise” your efforts.  My latest article for job-hunt deals with the tenuous balance of being “available to talk” and keeping your research “off the radar.”

As always, feel free to add your comments or experiences within this article’s Comments section.

Article:  How to Find a Job While You Have One

October 9, 2014 Posted by | Careers, Job Search, Job-Hunt.org article, Working with Recruiters | 2 Comments

Career Blogs Resource

I don’t often share other blog articles within my Blog, although I would if I had more time to review all the great resources out there.  But once in a while, there’s an article that clearly must be shared.  Especially when it covers as much ground as this one.  John Fawkes has compiled a list of 25 helpful career-focused blog writers that you might find helpful.  Enjoy.

Article:  25 career blogs you don’t want to miss

October 9, 2014 Posted by | Careers, Guest Post | 2 Comments

Tips to Land a Job in 2014

One of my colleagues asked six experts and prolific bloggers in the career resource/recruiting industry a simple question:

“What are your top 3 useful tips that a job seeker would need in 2014 to land a job?”

Here’s what he collected:

Article: Career Expert Roundup: 3 Tips To Land A Job in 2014

February 18, 2014 Posted by | Careers, Interview with Jeff, Job Search, Personal Branding, Resume Writing, Social Media, Working with Recruiters | 1 Comment

Counter-Offers Can Be Counterproductive

Once in a while, when a job seeker submits their resignation and offers a two-week’s notice, they get a surprise in return: a counter-offer. Quite frequently this includes a match on salary with the new company and sometimes an increase in responsibility. In this situation, many things can go wrong for all involved.

The Candidate Perspective

I once had a friend go through this experience and he was perplexed as to which path to take. He was the one to instigate a job search process, so I was a little surprised there was even a decision to be made. After all, once you start a job search, it’s likely you have already decided, for whatever reason, that it is time to go. The counter-offer covered both money and responsibility. Even long-term growth potential. My friend had a long list of concerns, but in the end, I asked a simple question: “When you drive to work each day, what is it you want to do when you get there?”

In other words, no two jobs or companies are exactly the same. When the current company offers you reasons to stay, you need to remind yourself why you wanted to leave. Will those issues be addressed? Even if there are promises to address them, will they be able to live up to their intentions? Does past performance indicate they are true to their word? Without an employment contract, their word is all you have.

Just remember, money and title are nice. But 40-70+ hours of work per week is a long time to spend doing something (or being somewhere) you don’t enjoy. Most people want to accomplish something professionally. Be sure to consider which opportunity truly offers this chance?

The Current Employer Perspective

No one likes to lose good employees. Especially if we have groomed them, trained them, and depended on them for a long time. However, when an employee makes the hard decision to leave, you must accept you missed the boat somewhere and didn’t address the issues along the way. Trying to band-aid the situation by keeping them on board will likely prove to be temporary. The joy of a raise and new title is short-lived in the working world. Six months later, they will realize they still want to move on.

Sometimes the boss offers a counter just to protect their own reputation. Are you the first to leave the group in a while, or part of a series of folks leaving? Is the timing really bad for the company? You need to assess why the offer is being presented. Is it simply because you are too good to lose? And if so, why did it take a resignation to prompt this kind of action?

If you accept the counter, you should realize that some companies will start a search for a replacement anticipating your future departure. This is a disastrous situation as you may be potentially fired (or overlooked for future promotions). Instead of people moving on and new people moving in allowing for growth for all involved, the situation turns stagnant, and sometimes unfriendly.

The New Employer Perspective

No company has time to waste in a job search. They do not like interviewing candidates who turn out to be just “kicking the tires” and “seeing what’s out there.” They want to meet candidates who are ready to join their team, not consider it.

When a candidate rejects an offer to stay where they are, the relationship between the two is strained or severed. In essence, the company feels the candidate was not honest during the process.This impression is all they remember (and likely marked in their records/database).

If you are only curious about opportunities at a company, take one of their current (or past) employees out to lunch so you can get a true perspective of what it’s like to work there.

Bottom Line

When considering whether you want to leave, make a sound decision. Ask yourself right at the start, “If my company countered an equal offer, would I consider it? And why?” You may just need to have a heart-to-heart with your boss and ask how you can improve your current situation through increased responsibility or redirection of your role. If you do decide to leave, don’t look back unless you’re absolutely certain your old job will become better than the new job.

January 14, 2014 Posted by | Careers, General Musings, Working with Recruiters | Leave a comment

Know What You Want–Want What You Know

One of the hardest type of candidates to place is the one who has so many talents they have no idea what they want to do next.  Some expect a hiring company to see all their talents and invent a position suited to their abilities.  It typically doesn’t work this way.  At least not when you’re working through recruiters.  They have specific jobs to fill today, and future positions to fill within their specialty or industry.

The key to working with recruiters is to know what you want to do.  And, to want a job that will leverage your expertise.  It is very hard to jump to new job titles where you have little experience.  Recruiters will present only the most qualified candidates.  Period.  Once you are within a company, there may be ample opportunities to cross-train or gain exposure to other talents (and then make that jump).

In my latest article for Job-Hunt.org, I offer a step-by-step approach to determining the job description you want to share with recruiters.  I hope this helps those who feel a little lost in the job search process.

Article:  Knowing What You Want So You Can Find It

November 5, 2012 Posted by | Careers, Job Search, Job-Hunt.org article, Working with Recruiters | Leave a comment

Compassionate HR podcast with Margo Rose

MargoToday I had the opportunity to be a part of Margo Rose’s Compassionate HR program.  She has periodic podcasts focused on helping job seekers, business owners, and recruiters.  The recorded episode is available on her BlogTalkRadio channel–click this link and scroll to the 12/8/2011 timeframe in the index to find my podcast.

We covered topics such as:

  • How I got into recruiting.
  • How the economy has effected the industry.
  • What job seekers can learn from recruiters.
  • What is the most appropriate way for job seekers to market themselves to recruiters in their industry.
  • Anticipated accomplishments in 2012, both professionally and personally (Margo is a cyclist and couldn’t help asking me about my cycling goals)

If you have a question stemming from the podcast, leave a comment on this blog, and I’ll do my best to answer it.

December 8, 2011 Posted by | Audio, Careers, General Musings, Interview with Jeff, Job Search, Personal Branding, Recruiting Industry, Social Media, Working with Recruiters | 2 Comments